The world has changed dramatically over the course of a single month, and companies are struggling even more with things that have historically challenged them:

  • Finding the best people to run, build and innovate on their analytics tools and data
  • Making these environments accessible to employees in a work-at-home model

In this Forbes article, Louis Columbus cites a recent Dresner survey that shows up to 89% of companies are seeing a hit to their BI and Analytics budgets due to COVID-19. The survey includes these two recommendations:

Recommendation #1

Invest in business intelligence (BI) and analytics as a means of understanding and executing with the change landscape.

Recommendation #2

Consider moving BI and analytical applications to third-party cloud infrastructure to accommodate employees working from home.


89% of companies are seeing a hit to their BI and Analytics budgets due to COVID-19.


We’re here to help you explore your options.

Now that the role of analytics is more important than ever to a company’s success, analytics leaders are again being asked to do much more with much less — all while companies are experiencing staff reductions, navigating the complexities of moving to a work-from-home model, and struggling to onboard permanent hires.

To address these short-term shortages (and potentially longer-term budget impacts), companies are naturally evaluating whether leveraging a managed-service approach — wholly or even just in part— can help them fill their skills gap while also reducing their overall spend.

As they weigh this decision, cost, technical expertise, market uncertainty and the effectiveness of going to a remote-work model are all top-of-mind. Here’s how these factors might affect your plans going forward:

Factor 1: Cost

As the Dresner number showed, most analytics teams need to reduce spend. Doing this mid-year is never easy, and usually comes at the expense of delayed or canceled projects, delayed or cancelled hiring, and possibly even staff reductions. All of these decrease a company’s analytics capabilities, which in turn decreases its ability to make the right business decisions at a critical time. A managed services approach to meeting critical analytics needs, even just to address a short-term skills gap, can provide valuable resources in a highly flexible way, while saving companies significant money over hiring staff and traditional consulting models.

Factor 2: Technical Expertise

A decade ago, your options for analytics tools and platforms were limited to a handful of popular technologies. Today even small departments use many different tools. We have seen organizations utilizing AWS, Azure, and private datacenters. Oracle, SQL Server, Redshift all at the same company? Yes, we have seen that as well. Some of our customers maintain more than five BI tools. At some point you have to ask: Can we hire and support the expertise necessary to run all these tools effectively? Can we find and hire a jack-of-all trades?

In a managed services model, companies can leverage true experts across a wide range of technology while varying the extent to which they use those resources at any particular time. As a result, companies get the benefit of a pool of resources in a way that a traditional hiring approach simply cannot practically provide.

Factor 3: Effectiveness of Remote Work Engagement

If you weren’t working remotely before, you probably are now. Companies are working to rapidly improve their processes and technologies to adjust to a new normal while maintaining productivity.

Managed service resourcing models have been delivering value remotely for years, using tools and processes that ensure productivity. Current events have not affected these models, therefore making them an ideal solution for companies  trying to figure out the best way to work at home.

Times are changing. We’re ready!

Ironside has traditionally offered Managed Services, to care for and maintain customer platforms and applications, and consulting services, to assist in BI and Analytics development.

Companies can leverage our Analytics Assurance Services temporarily, for a longer period of time to address specific skills gaps, or to establish a cloud environment to support remote analytic processes.

With Ironside, you can improve your data analytics within your new constraints, while reducing your costs. We’d love to show you how.

Contact us today at: Here2Help@IronsideGroup.com

Over the past week, I’ve spoken to a number of customers and partners who are adjusting to the ever-evolving reality of life during COVID-19. Beyond the many ways it has affected their personal lives and families, we’ve also discussed how it has impacted their jobs, and the role of analytics in the success of their organizations.

During these conversations, a few consistent themes have emerged from the people responsible for delivering reporting and analytics to their user communities:

  • Reliability: Continuing to deliver business as usual content despite a suddenly remote workforce
  • Resiliency: Hardening existing systems and processes to ensure continuity and security
  • Efficiency: Delivering maximum value even in the midst of a short-term business downturn
  • Innovation: Finding new ways to leverage data to address emerging challenges in areas such as supply chain, customer service, pricing optimization, marketing, and others.

While none of these topics are new to those of us in analytics, the new reality brought on by COVID-19 has made it even more important for us to succeed in every area. In an excellent Forbes article, Alteryx CEO Dean Stoecker discusses the importance and relevance of analytics professionals in driving success for their organizations in these trying times.

As he correctly concludes,

“If anyone is prepared to tackle the world’s most complex business and societal challenges—in this case, a global pandemic—it is the analytic community.”

We’re all in this together.

At Ironside, we’re taking that challenge to heart and looking at how we, too, can refocus our talents to better help our customers. Our upcoming series, Strategies for Success During Uncertain Times, will cover the steps we’re taking to help our partners weather this storm.

As of today, we’re:

  • Holding on-demand “Coffee Breaks” with some of our most experienced SMEs
  • Increasing remote trainings on key technologies
  • Rolling out short-term hosted platforms to accelerate model development, especially for predictive analytics
  • Expanding our managed-services capabilities for platforms and applications, even for short-term demand
  • Increasing our investment in off-shore capabilities to reduce costs and expand coverage models and other areas, too

Additionally, we are offering more short-term staffing options to our customers. Read Depend on Ironside for your data and analytics bench for short- and long-term success for more about these services.

We’re here to help.

At Ironside, we agree that the analytics community is uniquely-positioned to help our organizations weather the COVID-19 storm, and we’re committed to making our customers and partners as successful as possible.

We look forward to speaking with you about your immediate needs, and continuing the conversation on these and other timely topics.

Contact us today at: Here2Help@IronsideGroup.com

Ironside has historically focused on longer-term, project- or services-based staffing. However, we understand that what you may need most now is immediate, on-demand access to highly-experienced professionals.

To address that critical need, we’re making some of our top people available for short-term work. If you have even the most temporary and immediate need to address capacity constraints, delayed hiring, budget limits, or just to knock a few items off of your to-do list, we can assist with a flexible, remote, talented, and cost-effective pool of professionals. Our areas of expertise include:

  • IBM Analytics portfolio including Cognos, Watson, Netezza and others
  • BI tools including Tableau, Power BI, QuickSight and others
  • Cloud-native technologies on AWS and Microsoft
  • Leading data wrangling, management, and catalog tools
  • Top AI and AML technologies from DataRobot, AWS, and more

The world may be up in the air, but we understand that it has to be business as usual for our clients. We’re here to help you with that.

Contact us today at: Here2Help@IronsideGroup.com

When it comes to AI and automated machine learning, more data is good — location data is even better.

At Data Con LA 2019, I had the pleasure of co-presenting a tutorial session with Pitney Bowes Technical Director Dan Kernaghan. We told an audience of data analysts and budding data scientists about the evolution of location data for big data and how location intelligence can add significant and new value to a wide range of data science and machine learning business use cases.

Speeding model runs by using pre-processed data

What Pitney Bowes has done is take care of the heavy lifting of processing GIS-based data so that comes ready to be used with machine learning algorithms. Through a process called reverse geocoding, locations expressed as latitude/longitude are converted to addresses, dramatically reducing the time it takes to prepare the data for analysis.

With this approach, each address is then associated with a unique and persistent identifier, the pbKey™, and put into a plain text file along with 9,100 attributes associated with that address. Depending on your use case, then, you can enrich your analysis with subsets of this information, such as crime data, fire or flood risk, building details, mortgage information, and demographics like median household income, age or purchasing power.  

Surfacing predictors of summer rental demand: location-based attributes

For Data Con LA, we designed a use case that we could enrich with location data: a machine learning model to predict summer revenue for a fictional rental property in Boston. We started with “first person” data on 1,070 rental listings in greater Boston that we sourced from an online property booking service. That data included attributes about the properties themselves (type, number of bathrooms/bedrooms, text description, etc.), the hosts, and summer booking history.

Then we layered in location data from Pitney Bowes for each rental property, based on its address: distance to nearest public transit, geodemographics (CAMEO), financial stress of city block, population of city block, and the like.

Not surprisingly, the previous year’s summer booking and scores based on the description ranked as the most important features of a property. However, it was unexpected that distance to the nearest airport ranked third in importance. Other location-based features that surfaced as important predictors of summer demand included distance to Amtrak stations, highway exits and MBTA stations; block population and density measures; and block socio-economic measures.

By adding location data to our model, we increased the accuracy of our prediction of how frequently “our” property would be rented. Predicting that future is an important outcome, but more important is determining what we can do to change future results. In this scenario, we can change the price, for example, and rerun the model until we find the combination of price and number of days rented that we need to meet our revenue objective.

Building effective use cases for data science

As a Business Partner since 2015, Ironside Group often incorporates Pitney Bowes data — both pbKey flat-file data and traditional GIS-based datasets like geofences — into customized data science solutions built to help companies grow revenue, maximize efficiency, or understand and minimize risk. Here are some examples of use cases that incorporate some element of location-based data into the model design.

Retail loss prevention. A retailer wanting to analyze shortages, cash loss and safety risks expected that store location would be a strong predictor of losses or credit card fraud. However, models using historical store data and third-party crime risk data found that crime in the area was not a predictor of losses. Instead, the degree of manager training in loss prevention was the most significant predictor — a finding that influenced both store location decisions and investments in employee training programs.

Predictive policing. A city police department wanted to a data-driven, data science-based approach to complementing its fledgling “hot spot” policing system. The solution leverages historical crime incident data combined with weather data to produce an accurate crime forecast for each patrol shift. Patrol officers are deployed in real time to “hot spots” via a map-based mobile app. Over a 20-week study, the department saw a 43% reduction in targeted crime types.

Maximize efficiencies for utilities demand forecasting. A large natural gas and electricity utilities provider needed a better way to anticipate demand in different areas of their network to avoid supply problems and service gaps. The predictive analytics platform developed for the utility uses cleaned and transformed first-party data from over 40 different geographic points of delivery, enriched with geographic and weather data to improve the model’s predictions of demand. The result is a forecasting platform that triggers alerts automatically and allows proactive energy supply adjustments based on predictive trends.

About Ironside Group and Pitney Bowes

Ironside Group was founded in 1999 as an enterprise data and analytics solution provider and system integrator. Our data science practice is built on helping clients to organize, enrich, report and predict outcomes with data. Our partnership and collaboration with Pitney Bowes lead to client successes as we combine our use case-based approach to data science with Pitney Bowes data sets and tools.

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